Thursday, July 7, 2022
UK

UK house prices in March increased 9.8% on annual basis

UK house prices

London continues to see the lowest annual growth, as average prices increased by 4.8% over the year to March 2022, down from 7.8% in February 2022

House prices in the UK have increased 9.8% in March on an annual basis, with the average property in the UK being valued at £278,000, according to the latest UK house price index data from the Office for National Statistics.

Coreco managing director Andrew Montlake comments: House prices cooled in March relative to February and we can expect more of this throughout the year given the frightening level of inflation. The Stamp Duty holiday, record low interest rates and the race for space triggered an unprecedented surge in demand and activity during the pandemic, but those days are now over.

9% inflation, rising interest rates and a potential recession ahead will impact demand while lenders are becoming ever more cautious, which will restrict what people can borrow. This will almost certainly see the rate of price growth slow during 2022 and into next year. Only the entrenched lack of supply can prevent prices from falling, Montlake explains.

Average house prices increased over the year in England to £298,000 (9.9%), in Wales to £206,000 (11.7%), in Scotland to £181,000 (8.0%) and in Northern Ireland to £165,000 (10.4%).

London continues to see the lowest annual growth, as average prices increased by 4.8% over the year to March 2022, down from 7.8% in February 2022.

Despite being the region with the lowest annual growth, London’s average house prices remain the most expensive of any region in the UK, with an average price of £524,000 in March 2022.

The North East continued to have the lowest average house price at £155,000.

Smoove chief commercial and growth officer Simon McCulloch says: More properties are coming onto market and selling faster than ever, and at record-breaking prices, yet house prices continue to rise. Even for first-time buyers, our data shows new instructions are up 54% from 2020.

He said: However, the rising cost of living, lenders pulling competitive rates, and base rate rises mean many buyers are becoming limited in what they can afford. Ultimately, there’s a clear dichotomy between rising prices, greater supply, and constrained affordability and we’ll see within the coming months if economic pressures test the market’s current trajectory.

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